Amazon Web Services in Action is available

Andreas Wittig – 06 Oct 2015

Michael and I have written a book about Amazon Web Services. Our goal was to provide you a deep introduction to AWS with a lot of examples. We have started writing our book in January 2015. And with a lot of support from Manning, our reviewers, and MEAP readers we have reached the goal to publish the book just in time for re:Invent.

AWS in Action at re:Invent

Available now

The printed book Amazon Web Services in Action is available now. The eBook is available as PDF, ePub, and Kindle mobi.

Amazon Web Services in Action

Buy now and use the code ctwreinvent to get 41% off: Amazon Web Services in Action

About the book

Amazon Web Services in Action introduces you to computing, storing, and networking in the AWS cloud. You’ll start with an overview of cloud computing and then begin setting up your account. You’ll learn how to automate your infrastructure by programmatically calling the AWS API to control every part of AWS. Next, you’ll learn options and techniques for storing your data. You’ll also learn how to isolate your systems using private networks to increase security. Finally, this book teaches you how to design for high availability and fault tolerance.

Andreas and Michael Wittig

Hej, Andreas & Michael here!

We launched the cloudonaut blog in 2015. Since then, we have published 325 articles: small tips and tricks, best practices, and service reviews. We enjoy writing about all things AWS a lot.

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Table of contents

Part 1: Getting started

1 - What is Amazon Web Services?
2 - A simple example: WordPress in five minutes

Part 2: Building virtual infrastructure consisting of servers and networking

3 - Using virtual servers: Amazon EC2
4 - Programming your infrastructure: the command-line interface, SDKs, and AWS CloudFormation
5 - Automating deployment: CloudFormation, Elastic Beanstalk, and OpsWorks
6 - Securing your system: IAM, Security Groups, and VPC

Part 3: Storing data in the cloud

7 - Storing your objects: Amazon S3 and Amazon Glacier
8 - Storing your data on hard drives: EBS and instance stores
9 - Using a relational database service: RDS
10 - Programming for the NoSQL database service: DynamoDB

Part 4: Architecting on AWS

11 - Achieving high availability: availability zones, auto-scaling, and CloudWatch
12 - Decoupling your infrastructure: ELB and SQS
13 - Designing for fault-tolerance
14 - Scaling up and down: auto-scaling and CloudWatch

Free download

Chapters 1 and 13 can be downloaded for free: Amazon Web Services in Action

Andreas Wittig

Andreas Wittig

I'm an independent consultant, technical writer, and programming founder. All these activities have to do with AWS. I'm writing this blog and all other projects together with my brother Michael.

In 2009, we joined the same company as software developers. Three years later, we were looking for a way to deploy our software—an online banking platform—in an agile way. We got excited about the possibilities in the cloud and the DevOps movement. It’s no wonder we ended up migrating the whole infrastructure of Tullius Walden Bank to AWS. This was a first in the finance industry, at least in Germany! Since 2015, we have accelerated the cloud journeys of startups, mid-sized companies, and enterprises. We have penned books like Amazon Web Services in Action and Rapid Docker on AWS, we regularly update our blog, and we are contributing to the Open Source community. Besides running a 2-headed consultancy, we are entrepreneurs building Software-as-a-Service products.

We are available for projects.

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